Course Descriptions


Core / Major

PTR251 - Certified Fitness Trainer

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 10 weeks
Session: Full

This course covers the principles of general personal training including anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, client assessment, exercise program design, general nutrition principles, motivation, special populations, and injury prevention.

PTR252 - Specialist in Sports Nutrition

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 10 weeks
Session: Full

This course covers dietary and supplement strategies to enhance athletic performance. Students learn to identify the dietary needs of both athletic and general populations based on age, size, activity level, and goal. Topics covered include the structure and function of macronutrients and micronutrients, how anatomy and metabolism determine nutrient needs, and various approaches to fine tuning performance through manipulating nutrient intake.

Prerequisite: PTR 251 (C or higher)

PTR253 - Specialist in Exercise Therapy

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 10 weeks
Session: Full

This course covers the skills necessary to bridge the gap between medical rehabilitation and post rehabilitation for clients with chronic medical conditions. Students learn to work with and develop exercise programs for individuals suffering from arthritis, osteoporosis, stroke, cardiovascular conditions, orthopedic conditions, asthma, diabetes, cancer, and muscular dystrophy.

Prerequisite: PTR 251 (C or higher)

PTR254 - Youth Fitness Trainer

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 10 weeks
Session: Full

Discusses growth and development, metabolism, physiology, body composition, training, endurance, flexibility, strength, plyometrics, program structure, sports psychology, nutrition, and injury as each relates to children and teens.

PTR255 - Specialist in Strength and Conditioning

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 10 weeks
Session: Full

Covers all topics related to programming and motivation for athletes including anatomy, physiology, assessment, flexibility, strength, programming for specific sports, athletic nutrition, sports psychology, and injury.

PTR256 - Specialist in Senior Fitness

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 10 weeks
Session: Full

Examines exercise programming for senior clients including topics on aging and exercise, chronic conditions for older adults, proper assessment, strength, flexibility, contraindicated exercises, and motivation.

Prerequisite: PTR 251 (C or higher)

PTR257 - Specialist in Group Fitness

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 10 weeks
Session: Full

Specialist in Group Fitness shows you how to use your knowledge and experience as an ISSA certified fitness trainer to design and lead safe and effective group training sessions. The course begins with the scientific foundations for group training design, including training-essential anatomy, physiology, and biomechanics, as well as how training elicits various physical adaptations. Material then advances to the practical application of these concepts as they apply to group training program design and implementation. Advanced concepts include programming, assessment, safety, exercises and equipment, class formats, performance nutrition, and marketing your classes.

Prerequisite: PTR 251 (C or higher)

PTR258 - Corrective Exercise Specialist

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 10 weeks
Session: Full

This course covers the skills necessary to use evidence based corrective exercise interventions to restore physical performance, improve physical performance, and reduce injury risk for those with movement dysfunctions. Students learn to identify the complex factors associated with poor movement patterns and correct them with the simplest methods possible. Please note: The information provided in this course is for general educational purposes only. The material is not a substitute for consultation with a healthcare provider regarding particular medical conditions and needs.

Prerequisite: PTR 251 (C or higher)

PTR259 - Specialist in Fitness Nutrition

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 10 weeks
Session: Full

Students learn the science behind proper nutrition and the art of applying the science as a nutrition coach. Topics include the anatomy and physiology of digestion, metabolism, energy transfer and balance, and the structure and function of macronutrients and micronutrients. Practical components include nutritional goal setting, collecting and analyzing client information, structuring an appropriate nutrition plan based on client level and goals, outcome-based nutrition coaching, and practical plans to help clients overcome common challenges.

PTR260 - Bodybuilding Specialist

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 10 weeks
Session: Full

This course covers training, recovery, motivation, and nutritional strategies to prepare the personal trainer to work with bodybuilders. Upon successful completion of the certification examination.

Prerequisite: PTR 251 (C or higher)

PTR261 - Transformation Specialist

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 10 weeks
Session: Full

This course integrates the theory of behavioral change with practical strategies for influencing behavioral patterns as they relate to physical, mental, and emotional well-being. Students learn the skills needed to effect a qualitative shift in client behavior. Topics covered include the stages of behavioral change, motivational interviewing, positive psychology, commitment strategies, flow, and the experience sampling method.

Prerequisite: PTR 251 (C or higher)

(Previously PTR261 Behavior Modification Coach)

PTR371 - Principles of Kinesiology

Quarter Credits: 5

Length: 10 Weeks

Session: Full

Students will become familiar with the vocabulary of human anatomy, describe the essentials of human anatomy for movement, and gain the knowledge needed to pursue healthy living. By the end of this course, students will have a firm concept of how the human body is constructed and how it moves. Students will understand how the nervous system, circulatory system, and pulmonary system provide elements essential for skeletal movement. Learners will be able to identify problems and correct them and enhance physical activity

PTR372 - Contemporary Issues in Fitness

Quarter credits: 5

Length: 5 weeks

Session: A

This course covers current issues in modern sport. Students learn the opportunities   available in the sports management sector, develop management skills that can be applied across sports sectors, and gain an understanding of major challenges in various segments of the sports industry

 

PTR374 - Psychology of Exercise

Quarter credits: 5

Length: 5 weeks

Session: A

This course covers the application of
psychology to the industry of personal fitness training and exercise.                                   Students learn how to understand and modify exercise
behavior, as well as the psychosocial influences and consequences of exercise. Topics covered include theories and models of exercise behavior, social influences on exercise, physical activity interventions, personality, self-perceptions, stress, anxiety, depression, emotional well-being, and cognitive functions related to exercise

Prerequisite: PSY102, PTR251 (C- or higher)

 

PTR375 - Business Aspects of Fitness

Quarter credits: 5

Length: 5 weeks

Session: B 

This course covers the application of business techniques and principles to the industry of personal fitness training. Students learn to identify the various business roles and responsibilities of a fitness trainer, whether they choose to be a personal trainer in a fitness facility,a self-employed personal trainer, or a facility owner. Topics covered include creating a business plan, determining a business structure, screening and hiring staff, obtaining the right insurance, determining offerings and pricing, developing forms and contracts, becoming financially profitable and marketing fitness services

PTR376 - Research Methods in Kinesiology

Quarter credits: 5

Length: 5 weeks

Session: B

This course covers the application of evidence-based practice in exercise science.
Students learn about the important characteristics of evidence-based practice,
the origins of evidence-based practice, and the practical application of evidence-based practice in exercise science. Topics covered include sources of evidence, reading and interpreting research evidence, developing a question, searching for evidence, evaluating evidence, incorporating evidence into practice, confirming evidence in the individual, and reevaluating evidence

Prerequisite: MATH303, PTR251 ( C-  or higher)

 

PTR481 - Principles of Biomechanics

Quarter credits: 5

Length: 10 weeks

Session: Full

Students will learn the fundamental principles of biomechanics and how to apply
the knowledge to improve sport performance. Topics include linear and kinetics and  kinematics, natural forces, analyzing movement and addressing performance errors.  Students will learn the mechanical concepts behind human body and the anatomical terms used to describe different views and body sections. The application of the knowledge is exemplified through movement of the athlete, of an implement, of an opposition and through fluid.

Prerequisite: PTR251, PTR371 ( C- or higher)

 

PTR482 - Physiology of Exercise

Quarter credits: 5

Length: 10 weeks

Session: Full

The Physiology of Exercise explores the body’s systemic responses to daily physical activity and exercise. This course will teach basic functioning, including cellular communication and hormonal balance and how immune, nervous, and cardiorespiratory systems work together to maintain homeostasis. The importance of nutrition, body composition, lifestyle choices, and the environment are also considered during a thorough review of training performance. Special populations are also discussed, which will improve your exercise prescriptions for each client’s unique strengths and abilities. By increasing your understanding of
physiological responses to exercise and how to measure progress toward fitness goals, you will have the tools needed to work efficiently with diverse clients. You will be able to deliver outstanding, reproducible services to individuals whose life quality will improve because of your professional  recommendations and guidance.

Prerequisite: PTR251, PTR371 ( C- or higher)

PTR483 - Ethics and Management in Fitness Management

Quarter Credits: 5

Length: 10 weeks

Session: Full

This course introduces legal concepts and terms and examines them in the context of the field of health, fitness, and sports. It investigates specific strategies to help managers minimize or eliminate legal liability. The course looks at issues such as sexual harassment, safety in the workplace, and fairness in the hiring, promotion, and termination process. The course also examines ethics in the field of fitness, sexual harassment, and the importance of an ethical code of conduct.

Prerequisite: PTR375 ( C- or higher)

 

PTR499a - Externship

Quarter Credits: 1 

Length: 10 weeks

Session: Full

This course provides the opportunity for students to work with and learn from an expert in the health and well industry. Students gain knowledge, advice, and skills to assist in career development.

Prerequisite: Student must be in final year of the program (45 credits or fewer remaining)

PTR499b - Externship

Quarter Credits: 1

Length: 10 weeks

Session: Full

This course provides the opportunity for students to work with and learn from an expert in the health and well industry. Students gain knowledge, advice, and skills to assist in career development.

Prerequisite: Student must be in final year of the program (45 credits or fewer remaining)

 

 

 

PTR499C - Externship

Quarter Credits: 1

Length: 10 weeks

Session: Full

This course provides the opportunity for students to work with and learn from an expert in the health and well industry. Students gain knowledge, advice, and skills to assist in career development.

Prerequisite: Student must be in final year of the program (45 credits or fewer remaining)

PTR499D - Externship

 Quarter Credits: 2

Length: 10 weeks

Session: Full

This course provides the opportunity for students to work with and learn from an expert in the health and well industry. Students gain knowledge, advice, and skills to assist in career development.

Prerequisite: Student must be in final year of the program (45 credits or fewer remaining)


General Education

BIO105 - Anatomy and Physiology

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 5 weeks
Session: A or B

This course provides a basic understanding of the organization of the human body with emphasis on the clinical and pathological conditions of all body systems. Special emphasis will be placed on adding to the vocabulary of medical terminology and the dialogue with the doctor and other medical staff. This course will be organized systematically and approach the subject via organ systems.

CHEM306 - Introduction to Chemistry

Quarter Credits: 5

Length: 10

Session: Full

Students will become familiar with general, organic, and biological chemistry,including the body’s pH balance and how the body makes nutrition from food stuff. Students will learn key math skills and core chemistry skills, and gain confidence in using chemistry vocabulary. At the end of this course, students will be able to articulate the chemical complexities of carbohydrates, proteins, and many of the other building blocks in biological chemistry. 

Prerequisite: BIO105 or equivalent (C- or higher)

ENG110 - English Composition

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 5 weeks
Session: A or B

This course is an introduction to the writing process and to the major conventions of standard written English.

HIST102 - US History I

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 5 weeks
Session: B

This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic development of North America, the British Colonies, and the United States. The course provides a broad-base history of the United States from before the arrival of Europeans to 1877. Migration, colonial and revolutionary periods, the development of the Republic, and the Civil War are covered.

Prerequisite: ENG 110 (C- or higher)

HIST303 - History of Sport

Quarter Credits: 5 

Length: 5 weeks

Session: B

This course examines the emergence of organized sports in America.                         The course covers how loosely structured colonial recreational activities evolved and became an integral part of college life and revenue, and grew into a dynamic, high stakes professional sports industry. The course covers the role that athletic clubs and leagues played in standardizing game and safety protocols, and maintaining control over player salaries and careers. Students will learn about societal restrictions which prohibited most women from participating in competitive athletics for nearly half of the twentieth century, and why predominantly black colleges continued to promote women’s athletics during that time. Students will gain a better understanding of the discriminatory practices faced by African American athletes and athletes of other ethnic minorities, and how the civil rights movement finally gained traction toward integrating organized sports in the 1950s through 1970s. The course celebrate stories of a few courageous athletic pioneers who persevered to break down societal barriers. It will also look at a few landmark Supreme Court rulings and their impact on the athletic world. Finally, the course will examine the segregation in sports, racial integration of major sports leagues, and the impact integration had on African American leagues and colleges.

Prerequisite: ENG110 or equivalent (C- or higher)

 

MATH102 - College Math

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 5 weeks
Session: A

This course is designed to develop mathematical and computational skills needed by college students and aids students in making the transition from computational to application mathematics. The student gains practice in mathematical calculations including percent, ratio, proportion, measurement, evaluation of numerical expressions and using charts, tables and graphs to solve problems. Emphasis is on solving for the unknown to help students become comfortable using variables to represent numbers.

MATH303 - Statistics

Quarter Credits: 5

Length: 5 weeks

Session: A

This course includes data presentation and summarization, introduction to probability concepts and distributions, statistical inference, estimation, hypothesis testing, comparison of populations, correlation and regression.

Prerequisite: MATH102 or equivalent ( C- or higher )

PSY102 - General Psychology

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 5 weeks
Session: A or B

This course is an introduction to the field of psychology as the scientific study of the behavior of man. Through a blend of application and theory, students develop a basic understanding of psychological principles. These principles are then applied these principles in a variety of situations.

Prerequisite: ENG 110 (C- or higher)

SOC101 - Introduction to Sociology

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 5 weeks
Session: A

This course provides a broad overview of sociology and how it applies to everyday life. Major theoretical perspectives and concepts are presented, including sociological imagination, culture, inequality, and social change. Students also explore the influence of social class and the family as a social structure.

Prerequisite: ENG 110 (C- or higher)


Elective

BUS115 - Introduction to Marketing

Quarter credits: 4
Length: 5 weeks
Session: A

This course introduces key concepts related to marketing functions, the management of these functions, and how each function affects other functions within the marketing domain. The major functions are marketing management, marketing research, product planning, distribution channels, and pricing and promotion. The course will provide an understanding of marketing from the perspective of the manufacturer, marketing company, and consumer.

Prerequisite: ENG 110 (C- or higher)

BUS117 - Motivating for Performance

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 5 weeks
Session: B

This course introduces key concepts related to the kinds of behaviors managers need to motivate people to perform. It looks at the ways to set challenging, motivating goals, how to reward good performance and how to determine people’s key beliefs and individual needs that affect their motivation. The course also shows managers how to assess people fairly so they stay motivated and the causes and consequences of developing a satisfied workforce.

Prerequisite: ENG 110 (C- or higher)

BUS204 - Business and Management Principles

Quarter credits: 4
Length: 5 weeks
Session: B

This course introduces American business with an overview of various terms and concepts that provide a framework for understanding business. Topics include: business operational environments; organizational structures; management roles and functions; and the complexities involved with managing marketing, operations, information technology, finance, and human resources.

Prerequisite: ENG 110 (C- or higher)

BUS207 - Entrepreneurship

Quarter credits: 4
Length: 5 weeks
Session: A

This course introduces key principles involved in the planning and management of business enterprises, especially at the level of small businesses. Students will develop a business plan, and discover aspects of small business finance, sales and marketing, and infrastructure development. Students will collaborate in the analysis of business plans. Issues related to legalities, record keeping, and governmental assistance will be covered.

Prerequisite: ENG 110 (C- or higher)

BUS210 - Business Ethics and Law

Quarter credits: 4
Length: 5 weeks
Session: B

This course provides a study of the American legal system with an emphasis on how business organizations operate within that system, as well as an overview of the ethical issues and considerations that businesses encounter. Students learn about business law and ethics, contracts and sales, consumer protection issues and laws, agency and employment issues and laws, computer privacy issues, real property issues, and other relevant topics.

Prerequisite: ENG 110 (C- or higher)

COMM102 - Effective Communication

Quarter credits: 5
Length: 5 weeks
Session: A

Communication skills are developed through the use of effective listening, speaking, and writing skills. The student will develop the ability to speak clearly and effectively by learning to plan, compose and deliver ideas. Emphasis is on the global, ethical, technological, and customer service aspects of communication.

Prerequisite: ENG 110 (C- or higher)

COMM121 - Interpersonal Relations

Quarter credits: 3
Length: 5 weeks
Session: B

In this course the student will gain the ability to work effectively through and with other people. The student will gain an understanding of how people work together in groups. Topics covered include: human relations skills; communication and miscommunication; groups; team building; transactional analysis; organizational change; creativity; stress; and managing diversity.

Prerequisite: ENG 110 (C- or higher)

COMM161 - Business Communications

Quarter credits: 2
Length: 5 weeks
Session: A

This course explores the principles and techniques of effective written business communication. Students will discuss, critique, and practice business writing strategies to produce good-news messages, bad-news messages, persuasive messages, reports, proposals and presentations, while developing critical thinking, researching and interviewing skills. Business communication in a global business environment is also emphasized.

Prerequisite: ENG 110 (C- or higher)

COMM203 - Customer Service Principles

Quarter credits: 3
Length: 5 weeks
Session: A

This course introduces and reinforces basic service principles and helps students develop professional customer handling, telephone, and communication skills. Students practice listening and questioning techniques, call control and empathy. Difficult situations are covered, with an emphasis on problem solving and assertive communication.

Prerequisite: ENG 110 (C- or higher)

HIT135 - Medical Terminology

Quarter credits: 3
Length: 5 weeks
Session: A or B

A working knowledge of medical terminology is desirable for anyone entering one of the health science fields. This course will provide students with the foundation they need to recognize and interpret medical terms using the four word-part approach (prefixes, word roots, suffixes, and combining vowels). Students will come away from the course with a better understanding and mastery of terminology related to the health care field. Emphasis will be placed on improving written and oral communication skills pertaining to medical terminology. Identification of medical terms by word part is stressed, as are memorization, pronunciation, practical usage, and spelling.

PD102 - Personal Development

Quarter credits: 2
Length: 5 weeks
Session: A

This course takes the student through a personal inventory in order to establish educational and life goals. Students will learn how to battle fear of failure, utilize existing marketable strengths, build and maintain positive relationships, and promote self-confidence. An emphasis will be placed on learning to improve listening, reading, and study skills using approaches to time management and prioritization techniques.

PD103 - Professional and Career Development

Quarter credits: 2
Length: 5 weeks
Session: B

The student will prepare a resume, a cover letter, and a thank-you letter. They will acquire skills necessary to properly prepare typical pre-employment forms. Interviewing techniques are taught and practiced. This class will help to optimize a student’s potential for employment by developing skills in communication, business etiquette, problem solving, critical thinking, time management and interpersonal skills.

Prerequisite: ENG 110 (C- or higher)

PD304 - Leadership Principles

Quarter credits: 4
Length: 5 weeks
Session: A

In this course, students will personalize the multidimensional study of leadership and identify their personal orientation and philosophy after exploring historical leaders, various leadership styles and philosophies, and our present leadership paradigm. This uncover/discover process will include conducting various self-evaluations related to traits, skills, values, personal characteristics, and motivated abilities. Students will examine the art and science of leadership in a critical fashion by exploring the contemporary issues of today’s world along with the privileges and responsibilities assigned to today’s leadership.

Prerequisite: ENG110 or equivalent (grade
of C- or higher required)